Australia

The Costs of Commuting: An Analysis of Potential Commuter Savings

The Costs of Commuting: An Analysis of Potential Commuter Savings

This report estimates the potential savings that Australian and New Zealand commuters can achieve if they decide to use public transport rather than a private vehicle to commute to work. These estimates are based on the potential savings commuters can achieve in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth, Hobart and Canberra as well as Auckland and Wellington.

After identifying the potential costs to commute by car in Australian and New Zealand cities, this report uses two scenarios to examine potential commuter savings. The first scenario estimates the potential savings that can be made from leaving the car at home and using public transport to commute to work. The second scenario estimates the potential savings that can be made by selling the car (similarly, choosing not to buy an additional car) and using public transport to commute to work.

Cover of Progress in Australian Regions: Yearbook 2014

Progress in Australian Regions: Yearbook 2014

For the first time, the Progress in Australian Regions: Yearbook 2014 brings together information about Australia's regions from a range of different sources and presents that data in a consistent format over time.

The Yearbook provides a statistical resource that can help answer the question of how the nation's regions are progressing against economic, social, environmental and governance indicators enabling governments, private investors and the community to identify trends that are important for policy development and investment decisions.

Cover of AHURI report

Changes in the supply of affordable housing in the private rental sector for lower income households, 2006–11

Almost one in four Australian households rent their housing in the private rental sector including many lower income households. Government housing policies increasingly rely on the private sector rather than social housing to accommodate these households and offer various forms of assistance to lower income households to assist them to access and remain in the sector.

The scheme that affects the greatest number of lower income private renters is the Australian Government's Rent Assistance scheme with an annual budget of $3.6 billion (2012–13) but state and territory governments also offer schemes to provide financial and other types of assistance, such as loans to pay bonds and various rent support schemes. For these initiatives to be successful requires an adequate supply of affordable rental dwellings for lower income households.

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